Street’s Stain Removal Guide

Our stain removal guide is simple, easy-to-use, and helps you remove some of the more common stains. So, if you know the type of stain you are removing, please click on the fabric care process you are working with below: Hydrocarbon, Perchloroethylene or Wetcleaning/Laundry.

To learn more about the identification and classification of the stain, scroll down for basic guidelines or check out our resources for a downloadable guide.

Street’s Stain Removal Guide

Our stain removal guide is simple, easy-to-use, and helps you remove some of the more common stains. So, if you know the type of stain you are removing, please click on the fabric care process you are working with below: Hydrocarbon, Perchloroethylene or Wetcleaning/Laundry.

To learn more about the identification and classification of the stain, scroll down for basic guidelines or check out our resources for a downloadable guide.

Before using any chemical product, read the product’s Use Instructions and Safety Data Sheets (SDS).  Users are responsible for complying with national, state, and local regulations regarding the use, handling, and disposal of these products.  Wear/use personal protective gear as described in product SDS.  If unsure of colorfastness of a fabric when using stain removal products, test garments in an unexposed area before attempting stain removal.  Avoid scrubbing or other harsh mechanical actions.

Stain Removal Process

When trying to identify the type of stain, it’s important to consider the following:

Begin by looking at the following:

  • Location – where the stain is located can reduce a great deal of guess work.
    • For example, if the stain is on the armpit area, it’s safe to assume it may be a perspiration stain.
  • Color – the color of the stain is a great indicator of the type of stain. 
    • For example, a pail brown stain can be the result of caramelized sugar.
  • Feel – is the stain hard / soft, dry / moist, etc.
  • Appearance – built-up, only on one side of the fabric, shape, etc.
    • For example, glue tends to be only on one side and on top of the fiber, unlike an oil stain where it will follow the threads of the fabric. 
  • Odor – several types of stains will have a very identifiable odor, such as perfume or mustard.

After Identifying the stain, you must classify it as a dry-side, wet-side, or combination stain.

    • Dry-side stains are those that require the use of products and methods which contain no appreciable amounts of moisture.
    • Wet-side stains are those that require the use of water or steam for removal.
    • Combination stains are stains that are made up of both a dry side and a wet side component. They will require multiple steps to be removed. Always begin with the dry side and finish with the wet side.

Determine if removal of the stain requires solvent action (will be removed in the dry-cleaning machine), chemical action (requires the use of a stain removal product at the spotting board), or digestion (requires the use of a product containing enzymes for stain removal).

Select the proper product for removal based on what type of stain you identified.

ON THE SPOT™

Now that you have narrowed down the type of stain you are trying to remove, begin by selecting the method you will be using to remove the stain below: